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Thought No.1, and you are happy with your lens choice. Thought No.2, and you know not to fall for the gimmicks. So what then should you look for?

A – Opinions differ, and so do DSLRs, so first and foremost: get what is right for you.

Utmost importance to a photographer is the features and functions.

Maybe you like lot of outdoor photography? A camera with a good weather sealing would be handy. You love the way your old compact can view images and capture while viewing the LCD? Then check the Live View capabilities. Do not like wading through menu’s to change functions? Check the location/functions of all buttons and dials, and the customisation capabilities of these and the menu. You love to collect things and want to be able to purchase old lenses on EBay? Check the compatibility of the lens mount. Want to make extra large poster prints? Check the pixel count versus the image quality. Want to start studio photography? Then check out the remote flash capabilities.

There are many things to consider. My advice would be to narrow down what is most important to you, and go with it.

The other important consideration is the handling of your camera. Get down to your local photography shop and pick the camera up. Ask if you can mount the lenses you are considering for purchase, and see how it fits and feels in your hand. Play with the menu system and function buttons to check they are in easy reach. Even consider asking if you can place the items in a camera bag and feel for weight. You may be carrying this around for a whole day. If you carry your camera around your neck, try this also.

I was considering the D40 as my first camera, but decided on the D80. I felt spending a few more quid was worth it, as the D40 was a little too small for my hands. This is basic ergonomics. I knew I would be carrying the camera in my hand or on my arm most of the day and it must be comfortable.

B – Important to most people is the image quality.

Note: the DSLR considered to have the best image quality today, with in the next six months, and certainly one year, will be surpassed. DSLR technology is moving along at a rapid rate.

When you are researching image quality, also take into account lens types used in the tests, the specified conditions of the test, and which format is being referred to. All DSLRs have RAW and JPG capabilities. RAW is the unprocessed camera information. JPG is processed in camera.

When talking image quality, most commonly, noise will be discussed. Noise becomes a factor when using higher ISO speeds. Higher ISO captures more light, in turn allowing more creative control (when not using a tripod). The capability of noise reduction in today’s DSLR is moving on quite quickly. Nikon’s first full frame DSLR the D3, is a leap ahead of the rest for high ISO/low noise capability. But do not expect it to stay there for long. The sensor is said to be a Sony production, and Sony are promising a full frame camera very soon. Please note, that noise only becomes a factor when printing large images. If you do not intend to print over A4 size, do not worry about noise.

Also considered in image quality is the dynamic range of the camera, its colour reproduction and the amount of chromatic aberration. Dynamic range is of considerable importance, essentially being the range of light the sensor can deal with. Colour reproduction can be dealt with; in post processing if need be, with ease. Chromatic aberration should also be considered. It is not easily to deal with in post processing. Note that these three factors are all dependant on lens type and quality.

C – The camera system.

When you buy a DSLR, you purchase into the manufacturers system. I touched on this in Thought 1, as most of your money will be spent on lenses. In addition to lenses are all the other bits and bobs you are likely to need at some stage like flashguns, remote cords, infra red remote, software, and so on. For example, if you do not have much to spend on software, Canon DSLRs come with free software capable of processing the RAW images from camera, compared to Nikons which is an extra £130. So consider once again the type of photography you will be undertaking most often, and research what accessories you might need.

D – The future.

In this rapidly ever changing world, try to have some patience. (Unlike me!) Have a look at what is in the pipeline. Sometimes announcements are made about function or new technology that will be arriving in the coming months. So check and see what advances are about to be made, and consider their importance to you. An example is the Micro Four Thirds system announced by Olympus and Panasonic as noted in Thought No.2 with most useful live view to date and the smallest DSLR. Samsung has also claimed to be making a similar system, compact style DSLR, but it is not due for release until 2010.

When i was about to purchase my first DSLR, I used camera magazines and also the reviews on the net by DPreview, to do my research.

At this moment on DPreview, i read “Panasonic has unveiled what it is calling the World’s First Full-time Live View Digital Interchangeable Lens Camera – the Lumix DMC-G1”. There you go.

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Top of the list this week is Rose Atkinson’s image Diagonal. I love this image. It is a great example of simple photography. Rosa has an outstanding and original portfolio that i highly recommend viewing here.

One of my favourite entries is Peter Hill’s entry Urban Lines Project – Pyrmont Path. To me this image is a fine example of lines and their effect on everyday urban life.

My entry was New York City 8. This image was taken at the previous World Trade Centre site. New York City is a architectural photographers wet dream. Everywhere you look there are shapes and shades, lines and shadows, reflections and of course, people. I have a journal about my trip to the USA here.

This time i will add another three more entries, just for my love of lines.

Redtempa’s image Movement Of The People. A wonderful example of a long exposure. If you love Black and White photography, i suggest visiting his portfolio here.

Adriana Glackin’s image drawing the line is a wonderful example of lines in nature, as is PeteG’s image Golden Reeds.

Don’t forget, all this work is in aid of exposure to The Gift of Art, where all profits will be donated to Cancer Research charity. You can purchase art from The Gift of Art, here.

See you next Challenge.

Diagonal by Rose Atkinson

Urban Lines Project – Pyrmont Path by Peter Hill

New York City 8 by Adrian Rachele

Movement Of The People by Redtempa

drawing the line by Adriana Glackin

Golden Reeds by PeteG

Top of the list this week is Mark Germans entry Hope. This image is beautifully captured with wonderful light and symbolism.

Dana DiPasquale‘s entry Maybe This Year Will be Better Than The Last is a classic, wonderfully framed, soft and serene image.

My entry Ode to Life came equal second. This image was taken when my wife and i were just about to leave Brugge, packs on our backs, walking to the train station. We had some time, so we sat, relaxed, and breathed in the beauty of Belgium, one more time. It will always remind me of those times of peace between travelling.

Hope by Mark German

Maybe This Year Will be Better Than The Last by Dana DiPasquale

Ode to Life by Adrian Rachele

I am happy to say that i have come first in the latest Promote each other competition.

My entry Sister Two was taken of my sister-in-law after our visit to Auschwitz. We went to a bar in the old Jewish quarter of Krakow, to have a drink and reflect. I think this image best displays our feelings at the time. A feeling none of us had ever experienced before. To have been, too see, to smell such a place of despair and death.

Sue Wickhams entry On Her Way was the last photo she took of her daughter before she left in the car, on her way to the church with her father, to be married.

Dana DiPasquale’s entry Waiting to Say Goodbye was taken when waiting to attend funeral services for a beloved uncle that has passed away. She saw these antique children’s chairs that her aunt had and decided to spend some time taking photos of them to get her mind off of things.

Sister Two by Adrian Rachele

On Her Way by Sue Wickham

Waiting to Say Goodbye by Dana DiPasquale

I begin this blog, motivated by my good friends at Redbubble.

I have been invited to participate in the promotion of my fellow artists and support a good cause in the meantime. Sounds like a win, win situation to me. I feel honoured to be part of such a diverse and talented community, for my part as a humble photographer.

At the top of this blog, I have added the top crop of one of the few images which motivated me, and inspired me to continue Photography. Especially when I am abroad. This image was taken with a simple Canon A80 compact camera back in 2003. Three images stitched in Photoshop. My wife and I were on our way back up the south coast of Iceland to bathe in the blue lagoon. I just had to stop, and you can see why. The image was taken at the amazing Jökulsárlón glacier lake. This place is a must see when or if you ever have the chance to go. Just one of many of the amazing natural wonders of Iceland. I sound like a bloody commercial! I loved it there. In my definite top 5 places to visit before you die. I hope one day to return. But that moment has passed, is now recorded, and most probably never to be repeated, in my line of sight, in my lifetime. This image reminds me, every time, why a pick up the camera.

You can find a few more at my Redbubble page as well as other images of a few of the places i have been able to visit.

As well as this blog being a place to cross promote other artists, I figured I might as well add my tales of travel and leave a few images behind along the way. Maybe i’ll drop some hints on a few good places to eat, drink, and see while i’m at it.